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At either side of the balloon, about midway of the length, is a large propelling wheel like the wheels on a "sidewheel steamboat," and at the rear of the balloon is a propeller screw. Both wheels and the propeller screw are operated by means of the engines, and are to be made of aluminum. The striking feature of the machine, and the one which the inventor claims is entirely different from the device used on any other flying machine, is a shell which covers about three-fourths of each of the side wheels.

The inventor claims that by shifting this shell so that the open space comes at different points of the wheels he can cause the machine to ascend, descend, go ahead or back. According to the newspaper clipping referred to, the inventor has never made a full sized machine, but has a working model which is said to work successfully. Groves says he will guarantee the machine will work if the wind velocity does not exceed twenty miles per hour.

He desires to make an arrangement with the exposition management on the exposition grounds and operating it in connection with the show. It has been several months since the exposition authorities received a proposition from any of the numerous inventors of air ships or flying machines and the last one has an air of novelty, but it is scarcely probable that any very great encouragement will be held out to the proposers.

Special Commissioner R. Richardson, who has been in Little Rock and other points in Arkansas during the last two weeks stirring up an interest in exposition matters and the project of having a creditable exhibit at the exposition of the resources of the state, sends word that a delegation of representative men, members of the exposition commission recently appointed by Governor Jones, will be in Omaha Monday of nest week to look over the grounds and make arrangements for an Arkansas exhibit.

Fred Smith, a well known brick manufacturer of Omaha, will attend the annual meeting of the National Association of Brick Manufacturers which meets in Pittsburg next week and will attempt to have the association hold a special meeting in Omaha during the exposition. He will go well supplied with advertising matter and official invitations from the authorities.

Owens, director of the bureau of electricity of the exposition, has notified President Wattles that the American Institute of Electrical Engineers will meet in Omaha during the exposition, at a date to be fixed later. Now that the amendment has been attached to the Indian bill it will depend entirely upon the conferees to say whether it shall become a law or not. On the part of the senate the conferees will be Allison, Pettigrew and Perkins.

On the part of the house, Sherman, Curtis of Kansas and Little. It is within the house conferees that yeoman service must be done, but Mercer says his associates will be all right, in view of their interest in other measures affecting their own districts, and in which he is also interested. It is possible, however, that a fight may be made against the amendment on the floor, in which case the whole Nebraska delegation will take part in the discussion.

There are several elements to be conciliated and these Mercer will look after, especially one or two members from Chicago districts, who, smarting over their inability thus far to secure a repeal of the law creating an Indian supply depot at Omaha, have thought it good politics to oppose the Indian congress measure. However, with the conferees favorable to the amendment it is believed that any opposition that may develop will be summarily disposed of. In view of the handsome treatment accorded the Indian congress bill by the committee on appropriations, and also the Genoa school in the way of appropriation for steam heating apparatus, etc.

The last consignment of plaster models for the exterior finish of the Government building at the Transmississippi Exposition was today shipped to Omaha. James F. Early of this city, sculptor, who has charge of this work, said today that the colossal statue of the republic for the dome of the Government building will be completed and ready for shipment next week. Exposition matters are in a most flourishing condition in Colorado and there is no longer a question about the Centennial state being represented at the exposition in a manner which will cause its citizens to swell with pride when visiting the great fair.

The Colorado commission held a spirited meeting in Denver Tuesday night and heard the reports of the representatives who had visited Omaha, Messrs. Macdonald and W. Ward, and then the position of the state commission towards the various county and district organizations was defined in the following motion which was offered by W. Ward and seconded by Mrs. Emma Homan Thayer, well known in Omaha and one of the exposition city's firmest friends:.

The state commission extends to the several local organizations, such as the Arkansas valley counties, the western slope counties, the city of Denver and the northern counties, its hearty appreciation of their efforts in furthering the interests of the state in the coming Transmississippi and International Exposition and assures them of its heartiest sympathy and support.

And, that the secretary be instructed to inform the several organizations that the state board has in its possession assignments of space with regulations regarding them, together with plats and all information which is likely to be of service to local organizations, and suggests that they at once put themselves in correspondence with the secretary in Denver, in order that their own individual efforts may be expedited and simplified.

Schmidt of Pueblo, a resident of Omaha for many years. The resignation of George M. Mischke as secretary of the commission was accepted and A. Macdonald was elected to the vacancy. Lee announced that the state mining exhibit is stored in the capitol building and can be transported to Omaha at slight cost, with such additions as may be needed to make it one of the finest mineral collections in the west.

The exhibit to be made by the horticulturists will be under the general supervision of Mrs. Shute, secretary of the State Board of Horticulture; agriculture will be under the supervision of Messrs. Ellis and Allison, fine arts will be supervised by Mrs. Thayer and the educational exhibit by Grace Espy Patton. The members of the commission were greatly pleased with the locations assigned Colorado in the main buildings, as shown by the report of Messrs.

Ward and Macdonald, and the committee felt very much encouraged at the outlook for a fine exhibit. From every section included in the itinerary of the coming tour of Nebraska business men comes the most cheering news. In reply to letters of Chairman Green announcing the route there have been received many replies which indicate the interest taken in the success of the exposition, under whose auspices this tour will be undertaken.

Boyd, president of the Mercantile club of St. The communication refers to the wide publicity certain to be acquired through the medium of such a reception, and announces the fullest sympathy and interest in the great object, for which the tour was projected.

The Louisville Commercial club, through its president, T. Jefferson, announces that the delegation will be heartily welcomed. To those who have experienced the cordial character of Kentucky hospitality, the nature of this reception will be readily understood. Murray, superintendent of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, writes that the visitors will be tendered a reception on the trading floor, where ample opportunity will be afforded to exploit the interests of the great exposition.

By way of diversion a trolley ride through the city has been arranged, during which the delegation will view the beautiful surroundings of the great Queen City. This trip will include a view of the Ohio river from the magnificent new bridge, and a flying visit to Covington on the Kentucky side. Mayor Linxweiler of Dayton, O. West, editor of the Sunday News of Springfield, O.

Not only will we throw open the gates of our city to the Nebraskans, but will garland our outer walls and strew your pathway with roses. Mayor Taggart of Indianapolis announces that the Commercial club of that city has the matter in charge, and will extend a very cordial welcome to the delegation. Mayor Anderson of Jackson, Tenn. Wright Butler of Omaha preach at the Presbyterian church in that city on the evening of Sunday, February Captain M.

Saunders, chairman of the executive committee of the Harbor Improvement association at New Orleans, writes that the newly organized Progressive union of that city will have charge of the arrangements for entertaining the delegation.

As the party will reach the Crescent City in the midst of the annual mardi-gras festivities this stop is looked forward to with pleasing anticipation. Treynor, from the committee on legislation, made a rather unfavorable report at the meeting of the executive committee of the Council Bluffs Exposition association last night. Treynor had been delegated to go to Des Moines in the interest of the larger appropriation asked from the legislature for the Iowa building and exhibit.

The report contained a statement from each member as to just what he would and would not do in the way of voting for an appropriation. There was a disposition in the house to treat the exposition more liberally, but as the senate would have the final say, he feared that the original plans of the Iowa commissioners could not be realized unless something unforeseen transpired to awaken state pride and make it felt in the senate. He said there was a strong feeling in favor of the plan of enacting special legislation for the purpose of permitting the counties of the state to make separate exhibits, and a majority of the members of the senate had assured him that they would vote for such a bill if Senator Pusey would introduce it.

The report was discussed at length by the members of the association, and it was decided in the event it became apparent that no large general appropriation could be hoped for to have the special bill passed authorizing the county boards throughout the state to make the necessary appropriations for the independent exhibits to be made in the state building.

By resolution the legislative committee was instructed to confer with Senator Pusey and the Pottawattamie delegation with a view of premium amount to be appropriated by the counties, and this amount will be about what the larger counties in the state, like Pottawattamie and Polk, will be willing to set aside for the purpose.

Lafe Young, president of the Iowa Press association, submitted a suggestion that an invitation from the Council Bluffs committee would result in the State Press association holding its annual meeting here this summer. Young intimated that the association would like to meet about June 20, and after the work of the session was over spend a few days visiting the exposition and sightseeing in the two cities, and especially visiting the gardens and vineyards surrounding Council Bluffs. He said all the press association would expect would be the usual reduction in hotel bill extended to all members of large associations, and that the editors would pay their own bills.

The committee on solicitation was instructed to promptly act upon the suggestion and extend a cordial invitation to President Young to hold the annual meeting here. Young says there will be about editors present, and he thinks the free advertising the editors will give the exposition and Council Bluffs will be valuable and opportune.

The soliciting committees made a report of the subscriptions received during the two afternoons that they worked which greatly encouraged the association. The amount reported exceeded even the most sanguine expectations of the members. For the purpose of further strengthening the committees the chairman of each was empowered to impress any member of the executive committee he saw fit and have him aid in the work of soliciting funds.

The reports of the committees showed that only a small portion of the work of canvassing the city had been accomplished and they were given another week in which to complete the work. A request from the art department of the Woman's clubs that the association change the date of its meeting next week so as not to conflict with the Dickens party, which is to occur next Thursday night, was not granted.

Warren Hough of Crescent notified the association that he had recently received from a friend a valuable relic found on the Wounded Knee battleground which some Sioux brave had lost, and offered to contribute it to the curio department in the wigwam. There are at present in the city W. Stubbs, Ph. Lee, head of the station at Baton Rouge, on business connected with the representation of that state at the exposition. If they are successful in making desired arrangements the Louisianians believe the agricultural exhibit from their state will lead all others in versatility and luxuriance of products.

Stubbs says, therefore, that he expects that a good showing will be made from "the most fertile 40, square miles in the country. Stubbs and Major Lee are just now interested in the outcome of a constitutional convention which is being held in Louisiana and which they state is very incompletely reported in the papers. The convention was called by a heavy majority at the last election for the purpose of revising the constitution in the important regards of the elective franchise, the state judiciary and the school system.

In speaking of the state government of Louisiana, Prof. Stubbs said last night: "The present constitution is a reactionary measure framed just after the war and too much in accord with the carpet-bagging enthusiasm of that period. It allows the negro rights which he is in no condition to accept and which result in an injury to the state and to all concerned.

The proposed constitution will place upon the ballot the restraint of an educational qualification, or a property qualification, or both. The provision will probably be made that a man must be able to read and write and expound intelligently the constitution before he shall be eligible to vote. Thus, the negroes will be kept from the possession of the offices in the outlying districts of Louisiana, in some of which parishes they outnumber the whites by eight and nine to one.

In the whole state they are only slightly in the majority, but the proportion of , whites in New Orleans to 75, blacks leaves them heavily in the ascendancy in the planting districts. As the state courts are at present constituted they are most expensive and cumbersome.

The new plan contemplates the abolition of the appellate courts, when more business will fall upon the district courts, which will be enlarged. A probable educational feature of the new constitution will be that each school district will be empowered to vote taxes for the education of its children. It does not enjoy this privilege at present and districts which include an almost entire colored population are maintained by the taxes of outside taxpayers. Besides these there will be many less important changes, as for instance, the name of our 'parishes,' which is the old French term for 'counties.

The railroads of the country, and especially those running into Omaha, are taking hold of the advertising of the exposition with a vigor which is bound to carry the news into every household within hundreds of miles of Omaha, that the greatest exposition this country has ever seen is to be held in Omaha during the summer.

These roads are clamoring for advertising matter and requests are pouring into the office of the Department of Publicity and Promotion for the handsome framed posters which are designed to be hung in offices and hotels, and for pamphlets and other advertising matter, as well as for cuts of the buildings, which are to be used in the advertising matter issued by the roads. The latest folder issued by the Chicago, St. These folders are distributed all over the country in the railway stations and in places frequented by the traveling public.

The Wabash road devotes two pages in its latest folder to exposition matter, including cuts of the buildings, etc. The B. Thousands of pamphlets are being distributed all along the lines of this road. The Big Four has made requisition for a large supply of framed posters, bird's-eye views and pamphlets, which it wishes to distribute in its offices in the principal cities of the country. General Passenger Agent Eustis of the Burlington road is used cuts of the buildings in the literature issued by that road.

The passenger departments of the Rock Island and the Milwaukee roads have applied for large supplies of pamphlets, posters, etc. Governor Clough of Minnesota appointed as additional members of the commission to arrange for a representation of this state at the Transmississippi Exposition: V.

Simpson, Winona; J. Rich, Red Wing; A. Gordon, Austin; O. Myron, Ada; E. Valentine, Breckenridge; C. Graves, A. Thompson, Duluth; J. Greatsinger, C. Noyes, Conde Hamlin, George R. Finch, R. Kirke, St. Paul; E. Phelps, Thomas Shevlin, W. Heffelfinger, L. Pryor, Minneapolis, and M. Leland, Wells. Please accept the enclosed Badge, with my compliments. Next Monday morning George R. Williams, Bennington; J.

Watts, Waterloo; Andy Kewitt and Omar Whitney of Omaha, a committee from the Douglas County Agricultural society, will meet the county commissioners for the purpose of conferring relative to the appointment of a commission to gather and look after a Douglas county agricultural exhibit for the exposition. In reference to Douglas county and the exposition, the commissioners say that they are doing all that lays in their power to advance the interests of the big show.

Speaking of the balance of the proceeds of the bond sale, Chairman Kierstead said: "I don't think that we shall turn this money over to the exposition association. We will need this money in gathering and placing the Douglas county exhibit, and I consider it no more than right and just that we should hold it and expend it ourselves. The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors of the exposition was held yesterday afternoon and was a very animated proceeding.

Smaller subscribers will not be allowed to escape the payment of their subscriptions and they, too, will be made to feel the weight of the law if they persist in remaining delinquent. The charge was made that the Auditorium building on the exposition grounds is unsafe and liable to collapse when filled with a crowd and the architects-in-chief were directed to make a thorough investigation at once and report on the condition of this building.

The matter of appointing a director general, or some other officer having general direction of the work of all departments of the exposition, was brought up, but no action was taken because so many of the members of the board had withdrawn on account of the lateness of the hour, that there was no quorum.

The advisability of calling a special meeting to discuss this question was considered and this will probably be done. Nearly an hour was consumed in waiting for enough members to put in an appearance to constitute a quorum and when the meeting was finally called to order there were twenty-seven members present.

Lindsey referred to the situation which confronts the exposition and said the money is badly needed. Director Hibbard had the impression that it was designed to persuade the county commissioners to turn over the full amount of the proceeds of the bonds and said he was opposed to this, because he had worked for the passage of the bond bill in the legislature and had told his friends that the proceeds would be devoted to showing the resources of Douglas county.

After some further discussion to the motion was withdrawn and a committee of five was provided for, this committee to visit the commissioners and endeavor to accomplish the purpose covered by the resolution. The discussion of finances being in order, Director Manderson said some radical action must be taken to compel those people who had subscribed large amounts to the exposition and who were able to pay, but who refuse to do so, to pay up and bear their share of the burden.

There was no opposition to the motion and Manger Lindsey said he would apply the same rule to subscribers of smaller amounts where such action seemed advisable. This ended the financial discussion and the Department of Publicity and Promotion was called for. Manager Rosewater made a verbal report of the working of his department, saying that when the Promotion department was placed in his charge but four states in the transmississippi region had appointed commissions and none of the eastern states had taken action.

Since that time he said all of the transmississippi states except Washington and Oregon have commissions actively at work, and of the territories New Mexico has an active commission and Arizona will probably be organized within a short time.

An agent of the department has been sent to Washington and Oregon and returns are expected from those states shortly. Of the states outside the transmississippi region Mr. Rosewater said he was convinced that when the exposition opens there will be fully thirty-five states represented, and he reminded the board that this was about ten more than were at the Centennial exposition in Referring to the publicity portion of his department, Mr. Rosewater referred briefly to the articles which have appeared in the big eastern illustrated papers and magazines and the amount of news matter regarding the exposition which has appeared in the newspapers all over the country.

He also spoke of the arrangements which have recently been made with persons of great prominence to write exposition articles which will appear in the great magazines. For the Department of Buildings and Grounds, Manager Kirkendall submitted a written report, showing the progress of the work on the buildings and grounds, and the condition of the several buildings at this time.

When this report had been read Director Youngs caused a sensation by stating that he had been informed, by what he considered a good authority, that the Auditorium building on the exposition grounds was not properly constructed, and that it would not be safe to allow a crowd to enter the building for fear of it giving way. He said he believed that the building should be thoroughly examined before the construction had proceeded any further and every weak part strengthened in order to remove any suspicion of weakness.

Manager Kirkendall was on his feet in an instant to demand who had made such a statement. He said he had heard such a report and had made an examination with the assistance of Inspectors Tamm and Baker and had found the building entirely safe. A dozen of the directors asked for the name of Youngs' informant, and he announced that Inspector Baked had told him about the condition of the building.

Wait a minute! Let us look into this thing. We cannot afford to allow any doubt to exist regarding the stability of a building which may be crowded with thousands of people. It might result in injuries to people which would cost the exposition thousands of dollars in damages.

When quiet was restored the matter was discussed calmly and it developed that Director Youngs had his attention called to the condition of the Auditorium and he had gone direct to Inspector Baker and demanded to know what he thought about it.

Baker had told him that he considered certain portions of the building weak and unequal to support a heavy crowd. This had occurred about six weeks ago and it was stated that certain changes had been made in the construction of the building which might cover the defects spoken of by Mr. In order to make certain that there was no weak spots left untouched, a resolution was adopted, calling upon the architects-in-chief to at once make a thorough inspection of the building and report the result to the executive committee.

Manager Bruce submitted a written report of the Exhibits department, reviewing the work of that department since the last meeting of the directors. Manager Reed made a brief report of the operation of the Concessions department, saying contracts have been made for the following: Scenic railway, to James A. Sprague, A. Love and other Omaha parties; messenger service, to American District Telegraph company; official guide to Megeath Stationery company. A number of concessions are under consideration and will be closed within a short time.

Manager Babcock made a brief statement of what had been accomplished by the Transportation department, saying favorable rates had been made on all railroad and steamship lines. This disposed of all the departments, and Manager Rosewater brought up the matter of the appointment of a director general of the exposition. He made a forcible argument, showing that the time has come when such an office should be taken without unnecessary delay.

He reviewed the conditions existing and asserted that no exposition has ever been successfully conducted without that form of organization. Manager Kirkendall took Mr. Rosewater's statements as personal and declared he was ready and willing to resign, and offered to double his subscription if he was allowed to do so.

Rosewater denied any personal motive, but said the Buildings and Grounds department was the one most concerned at this time and a man should be appointed to take full charge. Rosewater said nothing had been done under this resolution and there is no probability of anything being done. Holdrege wanted to know if this matter was recommended by the whole executive committee or was recommended only by Manager Rosewater.

Chairman Lindsey said he for one was opposed to a director general because the committee had carried the thing along to its present stage and a director general might make the exposition a failure and the committee would then be responsible. Manderson called attention to the fact that there was no quorum present and nothing could be done.

A general discussion followed, in which Mr. Rosewater suggested a special meeting to consider the matter along with the water question. Director Manderson and others admitted the force of Mr. Rosewater's arguments and said something ought to be done at once.

They insisted that the whole matter had been turned over to the executive committee and that body should act. Rosewater insisted that the committee would do nothing. It had left the matter to Mr. Kirkendall and he had refused for over three months to do anything, and in the meantime the matter was dragging along and things were getting badly mixed up.

As there was no quorum present nothing could be done and the meeting dissolved with the general understanding that a special meeting should be called shortly to consider this proposition and the water question.

Colorado is the next state which will send a large delegation of her most prominent business and professional men to "spy out the land" and imbibe exposition enthusiasm, which is always on tap in Omaha. This much was decided on at a meeting of the Colorado Exposition commission held in Denver Wednesday afternoon, it being decided that Governor Adams and Mayor McMurray of Denver should appoint representatives of that city and state sufficient to fill two special cars, and W.

Bailey was appointed to make the necessary arrangements for the transportation of the party. According to the program, as far as arranged, the party will leave Denver in the afternoon of some day to be determined on later, and reach Omaha the next morning. They will remain in Omaha until the afternoon trains leave and reach home the next morning.

Commissioner Ward and Secretary Macdonald, who visited Omaha last week, filled the Denver people with enthusiasm regarding the exposition, and the rest of the state and Denver commissions are anxious to come and see what is being done. To even a casual observer Secretary John A. Wakefield of the Trans-Mississippi exposition has of late been showing evidences of a mental strain of no mean caliber. The secretary's friends have noticed that he seemed not only to have constantly that tired feeling, but his hair and flowing facial adornment were becoming rapidly streaked with white.

In a man of the youth and energy of the secretary this seemed to quite a number as a sort of phenomenon, and during a serious conversation the other night by a party of his more intimate friends upon the cause of this change, it was decided that the writer should see Mr. Wakefield and try to obtain from him the cause of his apparent breaking down.

A few days later the writer called at the secretary's office, and seeing, when he entered the room, that Mr. Wakefield was busy, he seated himself where he could quietly watch the object of his anxiety. In a few moments there entered the room a gentleman with a ministerial looking makeup, who inquired directly for the secretary, and, approaching that gentleman, he said: "I beg your pardon, but I am the Rev.

Samuel Oscott. You have heard of me, no doubt. I came to ask if you could kindly intercede for me, that I may be better able to support my large and rapidly growing family. Down at Hoetown we had it on good authority that you were the man who gave out the situations at the great and glorious demonstration of the power of mind over matter that will form a portion of the attractions at Omaha the coming summer, or words to that effect, and, as I am an able receiver, I thought I would like some position at your show where my great powers of manipulating the nimble nickel, whether it be in the plate or in the box office, could be more thoroughly demonstrated.

And—" Here the Rev. Oscott noticed for the first time that Mr. Wakefield had made his escape, and, as one of the office stenographers politely told the representative from Hoetown that he had better write out his application and send it in in the regular way if he wanted to be next on the list of applicants, the gentleman faded out of sight, and from the recesses of a dark closet there came in view the familiar figure of the secretary, with a look upon his visage which spoke louder than words: "Is it gone?

Hardly had Mr. Wakefield taken his seat before in came two lads, evidently from the country side. They immediately came to the point and filed verbal applications for positions as ticket sellers at the gates of the big show. They started in to expand upon their aptitude for the coveted places and had gotten as far in their family history as a story about the settlement of their grandfather upon certain broad acres to the westward before the security of the closet referred to hid the secretary from their view.

In the course of half an hour the same scene was repeated nineteen times, and as soon as the soft or irregular footsteps of a stranger were heard along the corridor the dignified secretary would make a spasmodic motion toward the closet. Between Mr. Wakefield's desk and the dark closet opposite the floor was worn so that the workmen were compelled to relay it with sheets of steel. When the writer was able to enjoy a quiet talk with the secretary it was after closing hours and at his suggestion the doors were shut and locked.

Then the secretary told of how the scene just described occurred daily, and that instead of letting up it was rapidly growing worse. There were hundreds of thousands of thousands more application than there were places to be filled, and every applicant for a position claimed to be particularly adapted for the place aspired to. Men, women, children, wives, mothers, sons, daughters, aunts, cousins, sisters, brothers, fathers and mothers'in-law, brothers and cousins-in-law, cousins-german, widows both grass and otherwise , came with virtually the same story, until his slumbers and awakenings were so confounded and disarranged that his lifeblood was gradually being sapped by the awful strain and his inability to rest.

Thus was discovered the wherefore of the secretary's premature decline, and the matter was laid before the executive committee at the meeting Friday. Heroic action by them was at once decided upon, and as a result the secretary's office has been supplied with the very latest appliances for handling applicants for positions, which is said to be in every way an improvement upon the device now in use at the White house in Washington, D. Trial of the machine was had Saturday upon an applicant for the position of whipper-in for the exposition.

While this embargo applies to those who are in the employ of the department, there are numbers of people who are in positions to know what is going on, but who are not compelled to "keep it dark" for fear of being discharged. Some of these assert that it is not alone in connection with the erection of the buildings that some peculiar conditions have been noticed but they call attention to some of the strange proceedings in connection with the landscape work on the grounds, which they say is somewhat remarkable, to say the least.

A well known florist of this city, who has taken a great interest in the preparations being made for beautifying the grounds, from the nature of his business, calls attention to some of the things which have been done, which he says indicate that things are running at loose ends. It is not necessary to refer to the changes made in his plans by Geraldine and the manner in which Geraldine, or some one else, attempted to get rid of Ulrich, but matters were finally fixed up about the time Geraldine 'resigned' and work was commenced on the bluff tract.

Ulrich took charge of this work and laid out plans and gave explicit instructions just how the work was to be done. Then he went away with the understanding that he was to come back in about three weeks and supervise the transplanting of the big trees which are now standing along either side of the main promenade on the bluff tract. He did not come and no one seems to know whether he is coming again or not. I know, however, that his instructions have not been followed and the work has been done in a careless ignorant and slipshod manner.

If those big trees live through the summer it will be nothing less than a miracle. They were not handled according to Urich's instructions, or according to the method employed by any reputable florist who knows his business. They were set out under the direction of a man named Hadkinson, who was brought to Omaha from Lincoln. I understood he acquired all his knowledge of tree planting from books and is a theoretical florist. He is in charge of the landscape work and I suppose he has been putting some of his theories into practice.

The big trees were planted in holes about six feet in diameter and about five feet deep. Hadkinson had them filled in with live horse manure and the trees were set in this and then covered with the same material. Everybody knows that this kind of dressing is extremely hot and the result has been that these trees have "bled" nearly all winter; by that I mean that the sap has been running out of the ends of limbs where branches were cut off.

How a tree is going to live without sap is a mystery to me. There are a great many other things about the "landscaping" of this tract which have excited remarks from people who have very little knowledge of such matters, but whose curiosity has been excited by the methods employed. For instance, the full force of the gardener's department was employed for two or three weeks last October in sowing blue grass seed on this tract, a space of about twenty acres, the average being about pounds to the acre.

A competent florist who was asked about the matter said that fifty pounds to the acre would be a liberal allowance. But that is not so material as is the fact that there is scarcely a spear of grass to be seen at this time.

The seed sprouted in the fall, but it was sown so late that the frost killed the tender shoots and there is absolutely nothing to show for the trouble. Besides this, roadways have been graded through this tract, buildings have been erected on it and material of all kinds has been piled all over the ground, so that it would have been impossible for any grass to grow on the tract if it had been started a year before.

The money spent for seed and the wages of the men who sowed it have therefore been entirely wasted and still there is no grass. Kirkendall, manager Grounds and Buildings department, in which he denies ever making a statement to me in regard to the strength of the Auditorium building. I have no wish or desire to do Mr.

Baker an injury. At the last meeting of the directory, after Manager Kirkendall reported on the condition of the different buildings, I considered it my duty as a director to call attention to what had become a common rumor, and which had been verified, in respect to the faulty construction of the Auditorium building. I requested that the matter be looked into and if the building be found in a safe condition there would be no harm done; if found as reported, it could be placed in a safe condition before serious damage was done.

Instead of taking these remarks in the proper spirit, Mr. Kirkendall got excited and demanded to know the name of my authority. On learning that it was Mr. Baker he jumped to his feet and exclaimed: "That man is not fit to be in our employ. Are we to understand from this that men employed in the Department of Grounds and Buildings are under instructions to "keep it dark," and that their situations depend on their following these instructions to the letter?

That certain members of the directory are barred from receiving information except such as is doled out at the pleasure of the heads of the departments? The developments in this case seem to point that way, for the next morning after the directory meeting Mr. Baker is "called down," and then appears his letter to Manager Kirkendall—which is kindly given to the press—in which my veracity is called into question, and which leads me to make this statement. Several rumors had reached me as to the instability of the Auditorium building and on the morning of January 12 I met Mr.

Baker with Mr. Rosewater in the business office of The Bee. Rosewater was discussing the advisability of a director general and enumerated cases where money had been wasted through the lack of a competent man in general authority on the grounds. Baker made no dissent to these sentiments in the presence of Mr. Rosewater, but when Mr. Rosewater was called away the conversation was continued for some time between Mr.

Baker and myself and was substantially as follows: Mr. Baker said there was no need of a director general, that everything was working smoothly and there were good men in charge of the different works. I then said: "Mr.

Baker, on your reputation as a builder, would you say that the Auditorium building is being properly constructed? Tamm would attend to that. Afterwards Mr. Creedon, the contractor, came to me and wanted me to assist him in making certain changes to strengthen the gallery.

I told him I would have nothing to do with the building. Baker has said substantially the same to other parties also. In Mr. Baker's letter to Manager Kirkendall he says: "Those minor matters you speak of have been attended to, which make the strength of the gallery doubly strong.

If these defects have been corrected there could have been no harm in bringing the matter up at the directory meeting and a statement to that effect by Manager Kirkendall would have quieted any doubt existing in the mind of the public. I cannot see what good will result in the publication of a letter from an employe written under such circumstances.

The "white cottage" on the bluff tract of the exposition grounds, which is being used as the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, seems to be a popular resort for sneak thieves. Documents of various kinds have been in the habit of disappearing very mysteriously, and nobody seems to know what has become of them. Under the custom governing the employes who use the office as headquarters the building is supposed to be occupied by some one at all times.

The night watchman is Joe Schwartz, a swarthy foreigner of uncertain age, who has been the body guard of Dion Geraldine for many years. He was brought here from Chicago by Geraldine and put on the exposition pay roll as a "rod man," and so carried for several months, although he did very little work in that line, being employed as an errand bot and spy for Geraldine. Since he has been acting as "watchman" for the cottage the place has been found deserted and the windows unlocked.

The latter part of last week the plan for the piling which is being done for the north viaduct across Sherman avenue was stolen from the white cottage and has not been found. The plan showed the location of each pile and on it the engineer, who supervised the driving of these piles, has noted the data which shows the force required to drive each pile, from which data is obtained the amount each pile will bear.

This data had been duly entered on the plan for the information of the engineers and architects, but the entire thing has disappeared. The responsibility for the loss has not been placed and no information is obtainable at the office of the department, all the employes being afraid to open their mouths. This is not the first time data which might cause contractors a little more work has disappeared from this office, but no steps have been taken to prevent a repetition of the occurrence.

The delegation is composed of representative business men of Nebraska and Iowa, who are visiting all the larger cities for the purpose of arousing interest in the exposition, which opens next June. At noon the delegates were escorted to the Merchants' exchange, where they were welcomed in an address by ex-Mayor Walbridge.

Cornish of Omaha responded. He explained to the 2, members of the exchange the plan and scope of the exposition and made an urgent appeal to them to see that St. Louis was properly represented. Vice President Charles R. Drake of Arizona territory writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion from his home at Tucson that exposition matters are taking a more encouraging turn in his bailiwick.

He says that the action of the legislature in refusing to make an appropriation for representation at the exposition has served as a wet blanket on all efforts to arrange for an exhibit, but matters have received an impetus recently through the efforts of Governor McCord, who called the attention of the mining men of the state, at a recent convention held at Phoenix, to the fact that the territory would not be represented by any exhibit unless private enterprise took hold of the matter and made the necessary provision.

The governor suggested that the mining interests of the territory subscribe to a fund for making a collective exhibit of the resources of the territory and that an effort be afterward made to induce the legislature to reimburse the subscribers. Drake says this suggestion of the governor is being agitated and he expresses the hope that something will come of it. Freeman Knowles, one of the representatives of South Dakota in the congress of the United States, was in the city yesterday and made it a point to visit the exposition grounds.

He was greatly pleased with what he saw and expressed his satisfaction at the substantial evidences of progress and the magnitude of the preparations which are being made. Knowles said he had been home on a short visit and was en route to Washington, where he said he would take great pleasure in lending all the assistance in his power to Representative Mercer in securing the passage of the Indian bill with the amendment providing an appropriation for the Indian congress in connection with the exposition.

The meeting of the Board of Trade of Newark, N. Halstead, the New Jersey agent of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, both of whom presented the advantages which the people of that state would derive from making a fine showing at the exposition. At the conclusion of their talks a resolution was unanimously adopted endorsing the work and declaring it the sense of the Board of Trade that the state and its manufacturing industries should be well represented.

John A. Merritt, third assistant postmaster general, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that Walter W. Pollock, the agent of the department in Wisconsin, has sent to the Postoffice department a photographic copy of Lamprecht's painting of Marquette discovering the Mississippi river. General Merritt says the photograph will be use din making the design for the 1-cent stamp of the exposition series.

The latest advices received by the Department of Transportation are to the effect that the Johnson Express Steamship company and the United States Express company will transport exhibits from England and France, intended for the exposition at half the usual rates, charging full tariff rates on the going trip and returning the goods to the exhibitor free of charge.

John Nichol, president of the Freight Claim association, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to the association to hold its October meeting in Omaha. He says he will lay the matter before the association at its meeting in Denver, May 4. There has been a great deal of talk, lately, about the "mystery" which is said to envelope the origin of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. Numerous claims have been made by various parties to the honor of being the first to conceive the idea of holding a great exposition at Omaha, which should exhibit to the world the resources of the great west.

These claims have been especially numerous since it has become apparent that the exposition is to be a most gigantic affair and a credit to the originator. There are fully a score of men in Omaha who can relate authentic incidents showing where and when they conceived the idea that a great exposition should be held in Omaha and their claims are supported by circumstantial evidence that leaves little room for doubt as to their correctness, so that all that remains is to establish their relative dates and forever settle the controversy, on the theory that the man who first mentioned the matter and continued to [?

The greater number of claimants for the honor of being the progenitor of the enterprise base their claims upon incidents occurring just prior to the passing of the resolution by the Transmississippi congress, which called the exposition into being. Some of these claims antedate the congress by a few days or a few weeks.

Among these later are ex-Mayor Bemis, R. Richardson and L. The two latter were appointed by Mayor Bemis as delegates to the meeting of the Transmississippi Commercial congress which was held in St. Louis in and were responsible for the selection of Omaha as the place for the meeting in It was through the efforts of Mayor Bemis and these two delegates that the Commercial club was induced to take hold of the matter of making preliminary arrangements for the meeting of the congress in Omaha.

In November, , just before the congress commenced to assemble, the idea of working up a sentiment among the members in favor of an exposition was discussed by these three and each is positive that he made the first suggestion. James Walsh is another aspirant for the honor of being the originator of the exposition.

He was a delegate to the congress and in a caucus of Nebraska delegates the day the congress met he suggested the introduction of a resolution providing for an exposition at Omaha, the buildings to be permanent and the show to be held once every five years. This suggestion finally culminated in the preparation of the resolution which was finally adopted by the congress, but the permanent features suggested by Walsh were eliminated.

At the last monthly banquet of the Commercial club President Wattles of the exposition said he had concluded, upon investigation, that Dudley Smith was entitled to the honor of originating the exposition, as he had suggested an exposition at Omaha while gazing upon the beauties of the California Midwinter fair at San Francisco during the winter of This claim at once disposed of the later claims of Walsh, Richardson et al, although Walsh charges that Dudley Smith was not a member of the delegation to the Commercial congress and had absolutely nothing to say at that time about an exposition at Omaha and took no part in the discussion.

Whether this be true or false matters not, for the reason that before the sound of President Wattles' voice had died out, after giving Smith the credit, Secretary Wakefield of the exposition put in a claim which ante-dated that of Smith.

Smith, Frank Brown and two or three other Omaha men, and the suggestion was made by some of the party, he is uncertain by whom, that an exposition would be a great thing for Omaha; that it would pull the money to the west instead of allowing it all to go east. In the absence of any further showing this would entitle Secretary Wakefield, or some other member of the little party on the Midway at Chicago, to the palm, but all of these claims are swept aside by a claim which is several years older than the oldest of them and The Omaha Bee stands as the originator and consistent exponent of the exposition idea as relates to Omaha.

The claim of The Bee dates more than ten years prior to the meeting of the Transmississippi Commercial congress in Omaha at which the exposition was given form, and the files of The Bee demonstrate the fact that to The Bee and its editor belongs the credit. The Nebraska State fair was held in Omaha from to , inclusive, but was removed to Lincoln after the fair of At the time of this removal there was a spirited controversy over the action of the State Board of Agriculture in taking the fair from this city and a series of editorials appeared in The Bee at that time, taking the position that the fair, as then conducted, was of no particular advantage to the city and advocating the establishment at Omaha of a permanent exposition.

There were a number of these editorials, appearing from time to time during the early part of The first approved in The Bee of January 22, , immediately after the meeting of the State Board of Agriculture at which it was decided to move the fair to Lincoln, and was as follows:.

While Lincoln may congratulate herself upon her victory, we do not hesitate to express our gratification over the action of the board. Omaha has outgrown all such artificial props as the State fair. She has the location, wealth and population for a permanent interstate exposition.

Instead of contributing toward the enlargement, maintenance and repair of the buildings on the fair grounds she may as well devote her money and resources toward permanent exposition buildings, just as Chicago and other cities have done. The Driving Park association should at once be merged into an exposition society, whose business it will be to provide the ways and means for collecting and exhibiting nor merely the farm products of the Missouri valley, but the products of our factories, packing houses, mills and breweries.

With the great cattle interests centering at our union stock yards, it will be an easy matter to organize an interstate cattle show in connection with the exposition, where the stock raisers of Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri may compete and participate.

The cattle brought to Omaha for the exposition may be marketed on the ground and the owners will, therefore, have a double incentive in bringing them here. The efforts of The Bee to establish an exposition in Omaha were not relaxed after the series of editorials referred to, but similar editorials appeared in the paper at intervals and Mr. Rosewater talked exposition to many citizens of Omaha.

His ideas and suggestions were in favor of an interstate exposition in which the states immediately surrounding Nebraska should be interested. This idea was presented by him to George W. Lininger, as well as other people of prominence in Omaha, who recall the fact that such suggestions had been made from time to time. In the last state fair was held in Lincoln.

The revenues of the board had fallen off very rapidly for the last three fairs and Omaha interests commenced agitating the idea of removing it to Omaha. Committees were appointed and preparations were made to prepare a proposition to be presented to the State Board of Agriculture in support of the invitation to hold the state fair in Omaha.

At this time the following editorial appeared in The Bee in the issue of December 6, Before the committee appointed by the Commercial club, which is to report on the location of the proposed mile track and exposition grounds, takes action it would be well to consider the advisability and feasibility of location on one of the tracts recently purchased for park purposes.

Take, for instance, Miller park, which has as yet not been materially improved and cannot be made available as a competitor of Hanscom park. Elmwood park or Riverview park for years. Miller park is almost level and could be readily converted into a driving park, besides affording abundant space for exposition purposes.

If there is any need for additional ground on either side it can be secured by the right of eminent domain through the park commission at a fair price. The probabilities are, however, that no additional grounds will be needed, except for railway approaches. The roadway from the city to Miller park is a boulevard and if it was desirable the street railway would be extended from the fort to any point adjacent to the exposition grounds.

All the railroads can without a very heavy outlay extend tracks to points within easy reach. Quite apart from the advantage to be derived from the fact that the city already owns this park and no taxes will ever be collectible thereon, there is the further incentive that all improvements can be made with a view to a permanent exposition or a zoological garden on the plan of Philadelphia and Cincinnati.

That would form an attraction all the year around and justify the acquisition. In its present aspect Miller park appears to be a municipal tree nursery which can only be made an attractive park by the expenditure of hundreds of thousands of dollars. To expend money on leased ground is a reckless waste, besides being a barrier to the erection of sightly and substantial exposition buildings. The fact is every building for public use should be constructed with a view to stability and permanency.

And while that is easier said than done, Timo is determined to succeed. When he rescues an enchanted beast named Broof, Timo gains a gruff and reluctant ally. But little does good-hearted Timo suspect that Broofs mysterious past will bring complications to his journey An engaging hero, surprising plot twists, and a host of fantastical creatures keep readers turning the pages of this spell-binding fantasy. Exploding from the beloved Glorkian Warrior video game and graphic novels: a hilarious new outer-space adventure, from the award-winning creator of Johnny Boo!

Who keeps the galaxy silly? The Glork Patrol! When the patrol crash-lands on the sinister Bad Planet, Baby Gonk finds a giant egg Soon it hatches a baby Quackaboodle, the most dangerous creature in the universe! Will there be a fight to the death, or will the Baby Quackaboodle become the newest member of the Glork Patrol? Join author James Kochalka for a new beginning to the wild and wacky universe of Glork! Buying and moving into the run-down Jewel Motor Inn in upstate New York wasn't eleven-year-old Miriam Brockman's dream, but at least it's an adventure.

Miriam befriends Kate, whose grandmother owns the diner next door, and finds comfort in the company of Maria, the motel's housekeeper, and her Uncle Mordy, who comes to help out for the summer. The Thea Sisters are summoned to the Seven Roses Unit by Will Mystery, but when they get there Will is missing; the sisters follow a trail of clues to the Fantasy Kingdoms, and find out that the Mayhem Mirror has been disturbed, and a terrible curse is about to be unleashed on the Fantasy Kingdoms, and it will be up to them to find the eight Harmonies which can break the curse and save the Kingdoms.

Third-grader Lucy Lopez attends coding camp at her after-school program and becomes a coding star. Mila lives with her sisters, Pipa and Sanna, her brother Oskar, and their sled dogs in the forest where winter has held sway for five years, ever since their father disappeared; but now a strange scary man, flanked by twelve young boys, seems to have bewitched Oskar and taken him away--and Mila, convinced her brother is in danger, leads her sisters in a desperate journey across the frozen wild-lands to find their brother, and perhaps a way past an eternal winter.

Charles and his family foster Miki, a Bichon Frise puppy whose former owner taught her to dance. You may think they're gross and weird and slobby and strange, but they're not bad kids-they just don't know any better. Even though they all live together in one big tumbledown house and have as much fun as they can while trying to survive Smellville Middle School, they are pretty normal kids.

Except when compared to Peter and Patty Perfect, who are just, well Perfectly annoying, that is. When the Perfects' mom and dad, Penny and Parker Perfect, show up to prove the Garbage Pail Kids are living without any parents, the kids need to act fast. Will they be able to find their own pair of perfect parents in time? But that's not going to stop her and the rest of the junior explorers from embarking on another exceptionally perilous expedition.

It hasn't been long since Shay was bitten by a witch wolf, but he's in danger of turning into one himself. Only an ice queen's long-lost spell book and Stella's ice princess magic has the power to break the curse. The one thing standing in their way is a treacherous monolith no explorer has ever returned from In this final, daring installment of the Polar Bear Explorers' Club series, Stella and the rest of the gang embark on their most fearsome quest yet, plagued by distrustful mermaids, screeching red devil squids, irksome trolls, and a centuries-old curse.

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A joke which was perpetrated more than a year ago by a party of exposition officials and representatives which visited California and other western points in the interest of the exposition has come home to plague the officials who were mainly responsible for its existence, and who are now kept busy denying that there was anything more serious intended than a joke.

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Bain capital europe investments These claims have been especially numerous since it has become apparent forex swiss trader the exposition is to be a most gigantic affair arborville investments pants a credit to the originator. Insider and Institutional Ownership. Leflang, Lexington; Charles A. Governor Clough of Minnesota is in favor of a state exhibit at the exposition by his state and says publicly that it was a mistake on the part of the legislature that no provision was made at its last session for such exhibit. Thus was discovered the wherefore of the secretary's premature decline, and the matter was laid before the executive committee at the meeting Friday.
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Knowles said he had been home on a short visit and was en route to Washington, where he said he would take great pleasure in lending all the assistance in his power to Representative Mercer in securing the passage of the Indian bill with the amendment providing an appropriation for the Indian congress in connection with the exposition.

The meeting of the Board of Trade of Newark, N. Halstead, the New Jersey agent of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, both of whom presented the advantages which the people of that state would derive from making a fine showing at the exposition.

At the conclusion of their talks a resolution was unanimously adopted endorsing the work and declaring it the sense of the Board of Trade that the state and its manufacturing industries should be well represented. John A. Merritt, third assistant postmaster general, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that Walter W.

Pollock, the agent of the department in Wisconsin, has sent to the Postoffice department a photographic copy of Lamprecht's painting of Marquette discovering the Mississippi river. General Merritt says the photograph will be use din making the design for the 1-cent stamp of the exposition series.

The latest advices received by the Department of Transportation are to the effect that the Johnson Express Steamship company and the United States Express company will transport exhibits from England and France, intended for the exposition at half the usual rates, charging full tariff rates on the going trip and returning the goods to the exhibitor free of charge.

John Nichol, president of the Freight Claim association, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to the association to hold its October meeting in Omaha. He says he will lay the matter before the association at its meeting in Denver, May 4. There has been a great deal of talk, lately, about the "mystery" which is said to envelope the origin of the Transmississippi and International Exposition.

Numerous claims have been made by various parties to the honor of being the first to conceive the idea of holding a great exposition at Omaha, which should exhibit to the world the resources of the great west. These claims have been especially numerous since it has become apparent that the exposition is to be a most gigantic affair and a credit to the originator.

There are fully a score of men in Omaha who can relate authentic incidents showing where and when they conceived the idea that a great exposition should be held in Omaha and their claims are supported by circumstantial evidence that leaves little room for doubt as to their correctness, so that all that remains is to establish their relative dates and forever settle the controversy, on the theory that the man who first mentioned the matter and continued to [?

The greater number of claimants for the honor of being the progenitor of the enterprise base their claims upon incidents occurring just prior to the passing of the resolution by the Transmississippi congress, which called the exposition into being. Some of these claims antedate the congress by a few days or a few weeks. Among these later are ex-Mayor Bemis, R. Richardson and L.

The two latter were appointed by Mayor Bemis as delegates to the meeting of the Transmississippi Commercial congress which was held in St. Louis in and were responsible for the selection of Omaha as the place for the meeting in It was through the efforts of Mayor Bemis and these two delegates that the Commercial club was induced to take hold of the matter of making preliminary arrangements for the meeting of the congress in Omaha.

In November, , just before the congress commenced to assemble, the idea of working up a sentiment among the members in favor of an exposition was discussed by these three and each is positive that he made the first suggestion. James Walsh is another aspirant for the honor of being the originator of the exposition. He was a delegate to the congress and in a caucus of Nebraska delegates the day the congress met he suggested the introduction of a resolution providing for an exposition at Omaha, the buildings to be permanent and the show to be held once every five years.

This suggestion finally culminated in the preparation of the resolution which was finally adopted by the congress, but the permanent features suggested by Walsh were eliminated. At the last monthly banquet of the Commercial club President Wattles of the exposition said he had concluded, upon investigation, that Dudley Smith was entitled to the honor of originating the exposition, as he had suggested an exposition at Omaha while gazing upon the beauties of the California Midwinter fair at San Francisco during the winter of This claim at once disposed of the later claims of Walsh, Richardson et al, although Walsh charges that Dudley Smith was not a member of the delegation to the Commercial congress and had absolutely nothing to say at that time about an exposition at Omaha and took no part in the discussion.

Whether this be true or false matters not, for the reason that before the sound of President Wattles' voice had died out, after giving Smith the credit, Secretary Wakefield of the exposition put in a claim which ante-dated that of Smith. Smith, Frank Brown and two or three other Omaha men, and the suggestion was made by some of the party, he is uncertain by whom, that an exposition would be a great thing for Omaha; that it would pull the money to the west instead of allowing it all to go east.

In the absence of any further showing this would entitle Secretary Wakefield, or some other member of the little party on the Midway at Chicago, to the palm, but all of these claims are swept aside by a claim which is several years older than the oldest of them and The Omaha Bee stands as the originator and consistent exponent of the exposition idea as relates to Omaha.

The claim of The Bee dates more than ten years prior to the meeting of the Transmississippi Commercial congress in Omaha at which the exposition was given form, and the files of The Bee demonstrate the fact that to The Bee and its editor belongs the credit. The Nebraska State fair was held in Omaha from to , inclusive, but was removed to Lincoln after the fair of At the time of this removal there was a spirited controversy over the action of the State Board of Agriculture in taking the fair from this city and a series of editorials appeared in The Bee at that time, taking the position that the fair, as then conducted, was of no particular advantage to the city and advocating the establishment at Omaha of a permanent exposition.

There were a number of these editorials, appearing from time to time during the early part of The first approved in The Bee of January 22, , immediately after the meeting of the State Board of Agriculture at which it was decided to move the fair to Lincoln, and was as follows:. While Lincoln may congratulate herself upon her victory, we do not hesitate to express our gratification over the action of the board.

Omaha has outgrown all such artificial props as the State fair. She has the location, wealth and population for a permanent interstate exposition. Instead of contributing toward the enlargement, maintenance and repair of the buildings on the fair grounds she may as well devote her money and resources toward permanent exposition buildings, just as Chicago and other cities have done. The Driving Park association should at once be merged into an exposition society, whose business it will be to provide the ways and means for collecting and exhibiting nor merely the farm products of the Missouri valley, but the products of our factories, packing houses, mills and breweries.

With the great cattle interests centering at our union stock yards, it will be an easy matter to organize an interstate cattle show in connection with the exposition, where the stock raisers of Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri may compete and participate.

The cattle brought to Omaha for the exposition may be marketed on the ground and the owners will, therefore, have a double incentive in bringing them here. The efforts of The Bee to establish an exposition in Omaha were not relaxed after the series of editorials referred to, but similar editorials appeared in the paper at intervals and Mr.

Rosewater talked exposition to many citizens of Omaha. His ideas and suggestions were in favor of an interstate exposition in which the states immediately surrounding Nebraska should be interested. This idea was presented by him to George W. Lininger, as well as other people of prominence in Omaha, who recall the fact that such suggestions had been made from time to time.

In the last state fair was held in Lincoln. The revenues of the board had fallen off very rapidly for the last three fairs and Omaha interests commenced agitating the idea of removing it to Omaha. Committees were appointed and preparations were made to prepare a proposition to be presented to the State Board of Agriculture in support of the invitation to hold the state fair in Omaha.

At this time the following editorial appeared in The Bee in the issue of December 6, Before the committee appointed by the Commercial club, which is to report on the location of the proposed mile track and exposition grounds, takes action it would be well to consider the advisability and feasibility of location on one of the tracts recently purchased for park purposes. Take, for instance, Miller park, which has as yet not been materially improved and cannot be made available as a competitor of Hanscom park.

Elmwood park or Riverview park for years. Miller park is almost level and could be readily converted into a driving park, besides affording abundant space for exposition purposes. If there is any need for additional ground on either side it can be secured by the right of eminent domain through the park commission at a fair price.

The probabilities are, however, that no additional grounds will be needed, except for railway approaches. The roadway from the city to Miller park is a boulevard and if it was desirable the street railway would be extended from the fort to any point adjacent to the exposition grounds. All the railroads can without a very heavy outlay extend tracks to points within easy reach.

Quite apart from the advantage to be derived from the fact that the city already owns this park and no taxes will ever be collectible thereon, there is the further incentive that all improvements can be made with a view to a permanent exposition or a zoological garden on the plan of Philadelphia and Cincinnati. That would form an attraction all the year around and justify the acquisition. In its present aspect Miller park appears to be a municipal tree nursery which can only be made an attractive park by the expenditure of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

To expend money on leased ground is a reckless waste, besides being a barrier to the erection of sightly and substantial exposition buildings. The fact is every building for public use should be constructed with a view to stability and permanency. Even if Omaha should not get the state fair this project is feasible and would eventuate in an interstate exposition of the first magnitude.

The opportunity for putting the exposition idea into practical execution was presented when the session of the Transmississippi Commercial congress was about to be held in Omaha in November, This opportunity was taken advantage of and on the Sunday preceding the meeting of the congress, when many of the delegates were in the city and when the congress was the subject of much discussion, the following editorial appeared in The Sunday Bee of November 25, The construction of the transcontinental railroads gave the first powerful impetus to the development of the transmississippi country.

Twenty-five years ago the population of the states and territories west of the Mississippi was 6,,, and the states and territories west of the Missouri were credited by the national census with a population of 1,, In the transmississippi states contained a population of the states and territories west of the Missouri aggregated 5,, In there were only twenty-one miles of railroad in the country west of the Mississippi.

Today the railroad mileage in the same region exceeds 65, miles, of which 37, miles are boasted by the country west of the Missouri. The marvelous resources of this vast empire were only in a measure displayed at the World's Columbian exposition. In fact, the exhibits of the western states and territories were to a great extent overshadowed by the international exhibits made at Chicago.

Of the hundreds of thousands of people who viewed the World's fair comparatively few carried away with them a distinct impression of the productive industries of the transmississippi states. Even people who live in this section and who have contributed to its growth do not grasp their extent and magnitude. The inspiration for the Cotton States' exposition now being held in Atlanta doubtless lay in the conviction that an interstate exposition would go further toward promoting the development of the south than any other single agency.

That the judgment of the projectors of the Cotton States' exposition was eminently sound is attested by the success that has attended this great undertaking as regards both the number and variety of the exhibits and the financial management of the venture.

Not only have the people of the cotton states displayed commendable zeal in contributing toward its success with displays, but several of the Atlantic states, notably New York and Pennsylvania, are creditably represented. The Atlanta exposition has drawn hundreds of thousands of visitors from every section of the country and will be the agency by which a vast amount of new capital will be transplanted into the south.

What has been accomplished for the south by the Atlanta exposition can be accomplished for the west by a Transmississippi Exposition. With a population of 15,, to draw on and a country prolific in material wealth, a Transmississippi Exposition would be an assured success from its very inception.

Such an exposition would give the impetus to the westward trend of population and capital for which the people of this section have been striving. It would make known to all the world the capabilities of the west and revive activity in every branch of industry and production. The Transmississippi congress, which convenes in this city during the present week, is the proper body to take the initiative in formulating the plans for a Transmississippi Exposition.

Its recommendation in this matter would have great weight with both the state and national legislatures. Without disparaging any other city ambitious to secure the location of such an interstate exposition. The Bee believes that the claims of Omaha are far superior to those of all other transmississippi points.

Its location in the heart of the continent, midway between New York and San Francisco, makes it alike accessible to people east and west. Its railroad facilities in every direction are as perfect as those of any city in the Mississippi valley north of St. It is the center of the great agricultural belt and within a day's reach, by rail, of the mining region of Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota, and within two days' reach of the great mining states west of the Rockies.

Omaha is as near to the Puget sound country as is St. Paul and nearer by miles to San Francisco and southern California. It is hardly necessary to add that whatever is required of Omaha or pledged for Omaha to make the Transmississippi Exposition a success the business men of this city will carry out to the letter. On the recent trip of the "Chicago Special" from Omaha to Chicago The Bee reporter enjoyed the privilege of a talk with a number of people from various parts of the country regarding the Transmississippi exposition.

The view I obtained of the preparations for this great event in Omaha was a genuine surprise to me, prepared as I was to witness the evidence of a stupendous undertaking. Only those who have personally surveyed the site and the buildings in course of construction can fully realize the magnitude of the Transmississippi and International Exposition as projected by its ambitious management.

Every place I go I hear nothing but praise of the work and its promoters. Omaha will become the show ground of America and cannot fail to reap a lasting benefit from this exposition, which will be second to nothing ever before accomplished on this side of the water, with the exception of the Chicago fair. Many of the visiting newspaper men from the west, especially those from Denver, Leadville, Pueblo and other Colorado points, spoke in the warmest encouragement of the exposition and predicted its unqualified success.

Leffingwell will again come to Omaha as soon as the plans are approved and will at once let the contract. He says work will be commenced within ten days after the plans are approved. The building will be a very attractive affair, of classic architecture, and covered with staff. Chairman William Neville and Members Poynter and Whitford of the Nebraska Exposition commission are in the city for the purpose of sitting as a committee to pass upon the models of the groups of statuary which are to adorn the Nebraska building.

The statuary is to be provided by Kimball Brothers of Lincoln, the staff and plaster contractors on this building, and the models will be submitted to the committee for approval before work is commenced on the full-sized groups. Miss Forest Tucker of Galveston, Tex. It now seems highly probable that North Carolina will be added to the list of states which will participate in the Transmississippi Exposition, and that the state will be represented by at least one of its state institutions, with indications favoring the participation of other branches of the state government.

Withers, director of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment station located at Southern Pines, has applied for square feet of floor space for an exhibit to be made by this institution. The experiment station in charge of Prof.

Withers is supported by the state and comprises an extensive farm at Southern Pines, on which experiments in agriculture are conducted on an extensive scale. There are two departments, one devoted to vegetables and agricultural products and the other to fruits, etc. These products are cultivated in the most approved manner and experiments are made with various kinds of fertilizers, different ways of cultivating, and all the other investigations in the line of improvement which are of such vital importance to farmers, but which no farmer has the time or facilities for investigating for himself.

The application for space in the exposition is endorsed by a number of eminent authorities in agricultural matters, who commend the work of this station in the highest terms. Dawley, director of the Farmers' institute at Albany, N. Collingwood, managing editor of the Rural New Yorker, a leading agricultural journal; H. Van Deman, former pomologist of the Department of Agriculture of the federal government; H.

Stockbridge, professor of agriculture in the Florida Agricultural college, and Prof. Kilgore, state chemist of Mississippi. This matter will be taken up by the executive committee at once and arrangements will probably be made for setting aside space for the exhibit. William Armstrong, musical editor of the Chicago Tribune, spent yesterday in this city, vainly trying to secure an interview with Mr. Kimball, musical director of the exposition. Kimball being in Lincoln he could not be seen.

Armstrong has been much interested in the musical department of the exposition, and expressed himself as greatly surprised that it should have no representative here in Omaha. He was ready and anxious to give its plans publication in his paper and to aid in the upbuilding of the department in any possible way, but he could gain no information.

Late in the afternoon he received a call from Manager Lindsey of the Ways and Means department, and as the result of his interview was forced to conclude that almost nothing has been accomplished in preparation for the five months of musical entertainments to be begun the first of June. Armstrong expressed himself as much disappointed at the prevailing condition of things and was apprehensive regarding the future. He said: "The exposition will be a wonderful show. It will draw crowds from all parts of the United States.

It presents an opportunity for helping along the cause of music in this city and in this part of the country that will never come to it again; at least not while you and I are alive. I have seen enough of your city to believe that it is interested in music and that it has an art future to build and to be proud of. Now is the time to be up and doing.

The music of the exposition should have been organized six months ago in order to fully cope with the gigantic possibilities that then existed. I am very much surprised to find the choral forces here in Omaha unorganized. They should be in active rehearsal preparing to take part in the great festivals which might form one of the chief artistic features of the whole exposition.

At this late day surely not a moment is to be lost. Armstrong returned to Chicago last evening, but will be in Omaha again later in the season, when on his way back from a lecture tour now being arranged to include the chief cities of the Pacific coast. Manager Z. This is the vital point in the progress of the exposition and those people who subscribed for stock should come forward and pay their assessments. We have gone along with the enterprise on the theory that these subscriptions were all as good as gold, and we must have the money to meet our obligations.

Up to this time our finances have been in excellent condition and the delinquency on the part of some of the subscribers has not delayed us, but the time has now come when we need every dollar of the money and we must have it. I have not made a list of the delinquents since about the middle of January, and a number have paid since that time, so I am unable to state just how many are delinquent or the total amount of their subscriptions.

The greater part of the larger subscribers have paid all except the last two assessments, and many have paid only one or two assessments, and some have paid nothing at all. They are people who are well able to pay and should be made to do well able to pay and should be made to do so. I intend beginning action against all of these people who do not pay up between now and March The architects-in-chief of the exposition are rapidly completing the drawings for the minor details of the exposition work which may be regarded as in the nature of finishing touches and the working drawings and specifications for this work will soon be in the hands of the Department of Buildings and Grounds and be advertised.

The two restaurants which will stand at the east end of the viaduct leading from the main court to the Bluff tract are completed and have been turned over to the department. Advertisements for bid will be inserted in the papers at once, and the construction of these buildings will soon be commenced. These restaurants will be tall structures, standing like sentinels at either side of the broad passageway across Sherman avenue.

The architecture will be in harmony with the classic beauty of the main buildings and the height of the buildings will make them a feature of the general effect of the east end of the main court, as seen from the west. Each restaurant will comprise an enclosed portion on the lower floor which will be used as a dining room, above which will be a story open in all sides, the roof supported by classic columns, which will form a cool resort in the summer time, while above all will be a flat roof, suitable for a roof garden.

The working drawings for the south viaduct, leading from the main court to the bluff tract, will be completed early the coming week, and bids for the construction of this will be advertised at once. The drawings for the Transportation and Agricultural Implement buildings are well advanced and will be completed by the last of the coming week.

The episode in the proceedings of the Board of Directors at the last meeting, in which Director Youngs charged that the Auditorium galleries were weak, has called forth a denial from the inspector whom Youngs named as his informant. This denial was addressed to Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, who furnished the copy for publication.

It is as follows:. In reply, as to the strength of the Auditorium building on the exposition grounds, will say that I consider it perfectly strong and safe. Those minor matters you speak of have been attended to, which make the strength of the gallery doubly strong.

Have never stated to Mr. Fred Youngs anything at all about the strength of the Auditorium or any other building on the grounds, and pronounce his statement false in every particular. As to the sheathing boards on outside, will say that the specifications call for them to be placed sixteen inches on centers, and they are so placed.

Respectfully yours,. Governor Clough of Minnesota is in favor of a state exhibit at the exposition by his state and says publicly that it was a mistake on the part of the legislature that no provision was made at its last session for such exhibit. The St. Paul Pioneer Press of recent date prints the following interview with the governor on this subject:.

Now, the situation is, shall we not make an exhibit? It looks to me, however, as though certain individuals throughout the state were going to make an exhibit. There is quite a feeling in that direction, and I hope they will succeed. Of one thing I am assured, and that is that the state should have an exhibit at the exposition.

It can scarcely afford not to do so, and, as I said, I think it was a great mistake that the money was not appropriated for that purpose. The Idaho exposition commission has issued an address to the people of that state, asking their assistance in raising funds for making an exhibit showing the resources of the state. The address sets out the general plan and scope of the exposition and the advantages which it will offer to the people of Idaho to show to the world, and especially to the farmers of the middle and river states, on whom Idaho must depend for immigration, the advantages which the state offers in agriculture, horticulture and other industries, as well as mining.

Arrangements for the space to be occupied by the Wyoming Exposition commission in making an exhibit of the resources of the state have been fully completed, the application made and accepted, the space allotted and approved by both the Wyoming commission and the Department of Exhibits, and all formalities fully disposed of. The exhibit will occupy 1, feet in the Mines building and feet in the Agriculture building. A party of business men from all parts of the state will start from Omaha at this afternoon to make a tour of the south in the interest of the exposition.

Among the list are a number of men who were in the party which visited Texas early in December in the interest of the exposition. The party will be in charge of W. Green, who has been retained by the Department of Publicity and Promotion to conduct the party. Those who make up the party are: Rev. Wright Butler, Hon. Cornish, Hon. Corbett, A. Hardy, Omaha; B. Carlisle, Missouri Valley, Ia. McHugh, O'Neill, Neb. Orcutt, W. Edwards, R. Dinning, R. Purvis, H. Cady, G.

Munro, J. Gibson, M. Sears, J. Frenzer, F. Wead, E. Arthur, L. Patterson, A. Edmiston, W. Lorenzen, Omaha; L. Davis, H. Victor, W. Rehlaender, Nelson C. Brock, F. Bowen, Lincoln; C. Conklin, R. Smith, E. Peterson, J. Sutherland, J. Latta, Tekamah; C. Sheldon, F. Johnson, L. Brown, Holdrege; G. Darr, J. May, E. Leflang, Lexington; Charles A. Pierce, A. Shaw, Tecumseh; Judge J. Crawford, L. Rosenthal, West Point; Z. Noyes, Missouri Valley; R. Phillips, S.

Henline, Kearney; A. Hunter, G. Day, Superior; John Snodgrass, A. Burbank, Springfield; J. Smith, Beatrice; F. White, Plattsmouth; D. Heinshmeier, Glenwood, Ia. Peyton, Creighton; D. Frahm, Wakefield; P. Avery, Humboldt; E. Wickham, Council Bluffs, Ia. Cooley, Kenesaw; Dr. Glover, Arlington; R. McConaughy, M. Kaley, Red Cloud.

The oratory with which the citizens of the many towns through which the party will pass will be regaled will be supplied by Rev. Cornish and H. They will expound the gospel of the exposition at every opportunity and the lay members of the party will distribute exposition literature in large quantities.

Mathews, secretary of the Arkansas Exposition commission, writes to President Wattles that the members of that body will visit Omaha February The members will meet in St. Louis February 15 and proceed from that point in a body, leaving that city the evening of the 15th on the Missouri Pacific at p. The secretary says the party will travel in a special Pullman car from St. Louis and that there will be between twenty-five and fifty people in the party. Enclosed in the letter to President Wattles is a circular addressed to the members of the Arkansas commission, notifying them that arrangements have been completed for a special sleeping car from St.

Louis and requesting them to join the party at that point. President Bell of the Central Labor union has selected the following committee to make arrangements for the proposed labor congress to be held in this city during labor week: William H. Bell, J. Russell, George Clark, F. Kennedy and F. This committee will be reported to the Woman's Board of Managers of the exposition for appointment. The committee will work in conjunction with the convention committee of the woman's board.

The county attorney of Buchanan county, Missouri, the county in which is St. Not satisfied with this, however, the county officials have asked the attorney general of Missouri for an opinion on the subject. The Louisville Omnibus, the leading German weekly newspaper in the south, devotes two full pages of its issue of February 6 to an article relating to the exposition which is illustrated with several two-column cuts of the main buildings artistically grouped.

The Omnibus is one of the oldest German papers in the south, having been established thirty-two years ago. It has a large circulation among the Germans of the southern and middle states. At the meeting of the executive committee of the exposition yesterday afternoon, it was decided that in case the reply of the Omaha Water Works company to the demand made by the exposition officers for water is a refusal to comply, action will at once be brought in the courts to secure a mandamus against the water company to compel it to furnish the exposition grounds with water for all purposes.

General Advertising Agent Bonnell of the Rock Island railway was at exposition headquarters to consult with the officials of the Department of Exhibits regarding the booth to be erected in the Agriculture building by his road. He presented drawings showing the floor plan and the style of decoration of the proposed booth, indicating that the display to be made by this road will be of a most attractive character.

Kimball, one of the firm of architects-in-chief of the exposition, stated that he had received notice of the charge made at the meeting of the Board of Directors of the exposition to the effect that the galleries of the Auditorium were unsafe, and said he would proceed to make an examination to determine the exact condition of the building within the next few days.

Exposition matters have taken a new turn within the last twenty-four hours. The action of the Board of Directors directing the manager of the Ways and Means department to commence suits against delinquent subscribers to exposition stock, coupled with the fact that the board took no action whatever in the way of making a change in the organization of the machinery of the exposition, has aroused the feeling of soreness and discontent which has been latent since Geraldine "resigned.

Notwithstanding the fact that the Board of Directors did not take any action on the matter of appointing a general superintendent or director general at the last meeting the feeling is almost overwhelming among the members of the directory that some office of this kind should be created and some able man appointed to the position at once.

The only reason action has not been taken before this has been a feeling on the part of some of the directors that the matter had once been referred to the executive committee and it might be construed as a reflection on that body to take the matter out of its hands at this time. The directors are agreed that such an officer is absolutely necessary and they are not backward about expressing this opinion, but they differ as to the manner in which the condition should be brought about.

Alvin Saunders, the venerable resident vice president of the exposition, is most emphatic in his declaration that business prudence demands that there must be a "head" to the exposition. As a result it is impossible to get a decisive answer to any proposition. I have had experience in this way and I know what I am talking about. This thing cannot go along like this much longer without striking a snag, and we must have a head to it.

The executive committee should control this officer, but he should have full authority in matters of detail. Director C. Lyman is equally emphatic in his opinion that a general manager of some kind should be appointed to take general charge of the work. He is of the opinion, however, that the executive committee should determine just when this appointment should be made.

There is no doubt in my mind about the necessity for having an officer to look after all the details and if I was on the committee I should want him right away, but I believe the committee is the best judge of when that time has arrived. Director G. Holdrege said: "I can see the necessity for a general manager, but I believe the executive committee should first take action in the matter as long as it has been referred to them.

Thomas Kilpatrick, another director, said: "If it is thought best to appoint a general manager it should be done at an early day so as to help the exposition and relieve the executive committee and he should report to them on all important matters every day. While they would have control of all his actions yet, at the same time, so long as he conducted his departments with ability and honesty the chances are the executive committee would act towards him just as the directors act at present towards the executive committee.

The members of the executive committee have done a great deal of work, but it seems to much to ask them to follow out all the details to the end of the exposition, and I think that the appointment of a manager to execute their orders would be a welcome relief to all of them, and it certainly would be no reflection upon their ability or the work they have done.

The Department of Buildings and Grounds is the one which has attracted the greatest attention on account of the nature of its work. People who have any complaints to make do not mince matters, but make charges that are serious in their nature and indicate a looseness in the general conduct of affairs about the grounds that is somewhat surprising.

Among other things it is openly charged that Dion Geraldine is as much in control of the actual workings of the Department of Buildings and Grounds as he was in the palmy days when he signed himself, "general superintendent of the exposition. He makes his headquarters at the Dellone hotel and nothing is done on the grounds without his knowledge. He pretends to be here to bid on exposition work and to support this pretense he put in a bid on the north viaduct across Sherman avenue.

That bid was based on figures made by H. Tamm, the inspector in the employ of the exposition who was put there by Geraldine. Tamm figured too high, though, and Geraldine did not get the work. This contracting is simply a blind, however, because Geraldine is a partner in certain concessions which will form prominent features of the Midway.

The whole thing is a close corporation and I don't feel disposed to pay my subscription as long as things go on as they have been going. A contractor who was standing by when these remarks were made joined in the conversation at this point. He owns part of the piledriver which this man Green is operating. John Templeton also owns a part of this same machine and Green is simply a figurehead under the direction of Templeton.

Templeton is Kirkendall's chief clerk, but that don't prevent him from violating the rules of the exposition and owning an interest in the piledriving machine which gets all the work on the grounds. Green makes out his payrolls and Templeton pays them with his personal check. I know of one case where a certain piledriver had made an agreement to drive the piles for a certain building and had his machine on the ground.

The contractor had a meeting with Geraldine downtown and the job was given to Green. I know the contractor did not see Green, because Green was on the grounds all the time between the time when the deal was made with the first piledriver and the time when the contractor notified the latter that he had decided to give the job to Green. As an evidence that Geraldinism controls the department, parties point to the fact that the men placed on the department payroll by Geraldine remain there, regardless of their competency, while those who are believed to be opposed to Geraldine's "peculiar" methods soon find themselves out on the cold world.

It is openly charged that the reason certain contractors are able to underbid all competitors on exposition work is that they are assured sham inspection and that they may use inferior material with impunity, while contractors who have no pull with Geraldine know they will be compelled to comply strictly with the specifications and use first-class material, costing a higher price. Many instances are cited which go to prove that these reports are based on more than idle talk. Some of the stockholders who talk about these things blame Manager Kirkendall for allowing this condition of affairs to exist; others are more charitable in their remarks and freely exculpate Mr.

Kirkendall from any blame for these conditions. Among the latter is a director who was not present at the last meeting of the board. I have no doubt this is caused by the tremendous task he has assumed in addition to carrying on his large private business. He is a first-class boot and shoe man and has made a great success in his line, but what does he know about architecture, hydraulics, electrical plants, water works, drainage, and the laying out of grounds? A man may be a first-class business man, but might not be able to run a machine shop or a hotel.

The truth is, Kirkendall has taken a bigger contract than he is able to fill. He cannot be expected to show everything and has had no experience in the building business or in the many other lines which his department covers. I have watched matters pretty closely, and have known for some time that there was bound to be a big explosion. I thought it would come at the meeting last Friday and that is why I did not attend, but the inevitable must come sometime and the sooner some man is put in charge of the whole business who thoroughly [?

In line with the statements of the director quoted above it may be stated that things have been at loose ends on the exposition grounds for a long time. Just three months ago the directors authorized the executive committee to appoint a general superintendent of all the departments "who should be a practical builder. The next day Mr. Kirkendall appointed Templeton "superintendent of the Department of Buildings and Grounds," and notified the various inspectors, engineers, etc.

This action brought on a controversy. Kirkendall denied that he had made any such appointment. Following this action the letters sent to the inspectors, engineers and other employes in charge of the different branches of work, notifying them of Templeton's appointment, were recalled by Mr. Kirkendall, and the following very adroitly worded epistle sent to each of them, dated February Templeton in this capacity; so you will please report to him in all matters and receive from him such instructions as you may require from time to time.

I wish you to understand by this that Mr. Templeton will have authority to answer for me on the grounds, relative to all matters pertaining to the various departments. Previous to having a man in whom to "center authority" the affairs of the department had been in the hands of everybody connected with the work. Each inspector was supreme, likewise the engineer, the gardener and all the other employes who had the shadow of authority over any other person.

The inspectors followed the whims of their own sweet wills, the engineer went ahead with his work regardless of the consequences, the gardener conceived schemes and carried them out without knowing or caring how they fit the whole scheme, and nothing but "bull-headed luck" kept things running at all.

Even the man who is hired to watch the "office" at nights—another importation of Geraldine's, by the way—went away at night whenever he felt disposed, without securing the doors and windows. These have been found open by other employes, and various documents which would be of interest to certain parties have been missing.

Of course no one reported these things, because every employe had always before him the awful fate of one of their number who conceived the idea that as long as he was on the payroll he ought to take as much interest in seeing that the exposition was protected as though he was the director of the department. Acting on this theory he reported some of the higher employes who had "looked on the wine when it was red," and were not attending to their duties.

He was discharged almost immediately, and none of the other employes have experienced any desire to follow his example. They recognize the fact that complaints are not wanted, and they act accordingly, but this knowledge does not keep them from talking to others about the way things are being carried on.

These are some of the things the subscribers are talking about these beautiful winter days, and there are enough other details just as freely discussed to make a good sized book. The Traveling Men's Transmississippi club held its annual meeting last night in the parlors of the Commercial club.

The annual election of the board of directors took place and these elected officers for the club. Besides this business the club laid some plans for the entertainment of traveling men who visit the city during the exposition which is the main object of the existence of the body. The election of directors resulted in the selection of the following: Ed Drew, W. Butts, E. Streeter, M. Meyer, W.

Stone, M. Rayley, C. Close, M. Howes, F. This board later elected the following officers of the club: E. Streeter, president; M. Rayley, vice president; W. Butts, secretary and treasurer; W. Stone, chairman of the Board of Directors. The president and secretary were re-elected, having held their offices since the organization of the club.

The most important matter decided upon in connection with the exposition was that club quarters should be maintained. They will be located in some prominent building and will be suitably fitted up. They are to be opened up shortly before the exposition, and if they are found to be successful they will be maintained until its close. All visiting themselves of the privileges of the quarters. The Board of Directors will meet on next Friday to examine several suites of rooms and will then make the selection.

A suite on the first floor of The Bee building was very favorably mentioned. It was determined to invite any and all traveling men's associations in the country to take desk room in the quarters. This will be provided free of charge. In order to raise the revenue for the maintenance of the quarters it was decided to make the dues of membership 50 cents a month.

The first dues will be collected on April 1, by which time it is expected that the quarters will be opened and can be used by the members of the club. Some arrangements were made for an entertainment to be given in the parlors of the Commercial club either next Friday or Saturday nights.

The affair is to be of a social character. A program of music and speeches will be arranged. Later a banquet will be enjoyed. The entertainment will conclude with a dance and a card tournament. The arrangements are such that it is expected that the affair will be highly enjoyable and successful. Feminine friends of the traveling men will be invited to attend.

One of the very pleasant features of the meeting was the presentation of a handsome gold-headed cane to Secretary Butts as a mark of appreciation of his past efforts in behalf of the club. The cane was purchased by the club membership. The presentation speech was made by J.

Hommel, who said in his remarks that the club members felt that Mr. Butts had done more than anyone else in building up the club. Butts made a brief and feeling response. Citizen Tribune. Proposition 23 was asking voters in California to have a say on the staffing requirements for kidney dialysis centers.

The vast majority of people affected by kidney dialysis are patients. International Business Times. Dialysis Clinic Inc. Idaho State Journal. Cummings left his expansive old location on Astor Street and reopened in a smaller storefront on Duane Street near Heritage Square. He subleased the basement to a record store and will soon have a vintage shop in his main showroom. Temporary Change to Water Chlorination Begins October 26 The City of Sunrise Utilities Department maintains the highest quality standards to provide clean, safe drinking water to customers in its service area, which includes the cities of Sunrise, Weston, Southwest Ranches and parts of Davie.

From October 26 through November 18, the Utilities Department will switch from monochloramine to free chlorine disinfection in its drinking water treatment system to provide additional protection against bacteria. The following business licenses were issued between Oct. Hornell Evening Tribune. Noyes, along with all UR Medicine affiliate hospitals, will allow visitation in complicate with state Department of Health guidelines, The Daily News Online.

Now, app-based drivers for gig companies including Uber and Lyft are able to retain their independent contractor status, instead of being reclassified as employees against their will. The Pittsboro Drinking Water Task Force wants the town to provide deeply discounted reverse osmosis filtration systems to low-income residents while it continues to explore permanent solutions for a community rocked by contaminated drinking water.

The task force, which formed in November , issued its final report in October on We will contrast the two businesses based on the strength of their risk, dividends, valuation, profitability, institutional ownership, earnings and analyst recommendations.

Insider and Institutional Ownership. The issues facing voters range from the future of the cash-bail system, funding for stem cell research and a possible change